Stopover in Iceland | Icelandair
Pingdom Check

What is an Icelandair Stopover?

When you fly transatlantic with Icelandair, you can choose to add a Stopover in Iceland at no additional airfare. Stay for a day, or up to a week.

You can enjoy everything from geothermal bathing to northern lights gazing in Iceland, as well as all your final destination has to offer. Two destinations for the price of one!

Book your Stopover in three simple steps

plane-right Created with Sketch.

Decide where you're flying to

Add your Stopover in Iceland (up to 7 days)

Enjoy both destinations

Explore Iceland on an Icelandair Stopover

One of the best reasons for flying with us: On your flight across the Atlantic, we invite you to enjoy a Stopover in Iceland without paying any additional airfare.

We partnered with Ása Steinars, an Icelandic photographer and content creator, to put together some inspiring ideas for how to spend your Stopover time.

Check out Ása's videos for itineraries that make the most of 24, 48, or 72 hours in Iceland, then see our trip notes so you can follow in her footsteps. Mix and match to create the dream Stopover!

24 hours in Iceland

Dive straight in! Start your Stopover with a whale-watching boat trip out of Reykjavík, then hit the road and make a whirlwind trip of the incredible Snæfellsnes peninsula.

Snæfellsnes is sometimes called 'Iceland in miniature'. Here you can see a stunning mix of Iceland's renowned natural features, from black beaches to sea cliffs and photogenic mountains.

48 hours in Iceland

With 48 hours in Iceland, you can discover some of the classic highlights of the Golden Circle, and then get off the beaten track by venturing into the beautiful, empty Highlands, making a base at Kerlingarföll.

72 hours in Iceland

Three days? Lucky you! Fill them by exploring the south coast's magical waterfalls, glaciers, and black beaches. Enjoy extra flexibility and the chance to stay among nature by renting a campervan.

One of the best reasons for flying with us: On your flight across the Atlantic, we invite you to enjoy a Stopover in Iceland without paying any additional airfare.

We partnered with Ása Steinars, an Icelandic photographer and content creator, to put together some inspiring ideas for how to spend your Stopover time.

Check out Ása's videos for itineraries that make the most of 24, 48, or 72 hours in Iceland, then see our trip notes so you can follow in her footsteps. Mix and match to create the dream Stopover!

,

Dive straight in! Start your Stopover with a whale-watching boat trip out of Reykjavík, then hit the road and make a whirlwind trip of the incredible Snæfellsnes peninsula.

Snæfellsnes is sometimes called 'Iceland in miniature'. Here you can see a stunning mix of Iceland's renowned natural features, from black beaches to sea cliffs and photogenic mountains.

,

Reykjavík + Snæfellsnes

Best in spring, summer and fall

This 24-hour whirlwind starts in Reykjavík for whale watching and a classic hot dog, before venturing north to the incredible Snæfellsnes peninsula – 'Iceland in miniature'.

It's about 160km (99 miles) from Reykjavík to the first stop in Snæfellsnes, known as Seal Beach, then at least 100km (62 miles) to travel around the peninsula to reach Kirkjufell mountain.

When to go?

This trip is possible year-round. Whale watching boats depart from Reykjavík in winter as well as summer, and Snæfellsnes can be explored year-round, either independently or on a guided day tour.

However, the reduced amount of daylight hours in winter means we wouldn't recommend tackling the road-trip element of this itinerary over 24 hours during the colder months. The darkness and potential for poor weather and/or icy roads mean you would be better allocating at least 48 hours for this trip in winter, taking your time to see the sights.

Itinerary stops

Stop 1: Whale watching in Reykjavík. Check out our whale-watching in Iceland blog for all the tips on what you might see, when, and where.

Stop 2: Quick bite. The hot dogs from Bæjarins beztu pylsur are renowned!

Stop 3: Ytri Tunga (Seal Beach)

Stop 4: Búðakirkja (Black Church)

Stop 5: Arnarstapi

Stop 6: Malarrif lighthouse

Stop 7: Djúpalónssandur beach

Stop 8: Svörtuloft lighthouse

Stop 9: Ingjaldshólskirkja church at Hellissandur

Stop 10: Coffee break

Stop 11: Kirkjufell mountain. Be sure to admire the famous view from Kirkjufellsfoss waterfall; it's a short walk from the parking lot to the waterfall.

Stop 12: Overnight at Panorama Glass Lodge or somewhere close to Snæfellsnes, Reykjavík or Keflavík, depending on the time of your departure flight the following morning.

Stop 13: End your visit with a dip at the Blue Lagoon or another geothermal spot. Iceland has plenty of swimming pools and lagoons where you can unwind before your flight.

<iframe src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1MdF1b5S6XHbzqpo_bhgy-tgtZujFr_k&ehbc=2E312F" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="position: absolute;top: 0px;left: 0px;width: 100%;height: 100%;"></iframe>
,

With 48 hours in Iceland, you can discover some of the classic highlights of the Golden Circle, and then get off the beaten track by venturing into the beautiful, empty Highlands, making a base at Kerlingarföll.

,

Golden Circle + Highlands

Best in summer and early fall

A great way to see a few sides of Iceland is following this 48-hour tour that covers some of the classic hits and combines it with some lesser-known wonders. The Golden Circle offers a well-worn path for visitors to Iceland – and for good reason, as it takes in the beautiful Þingvellir National Park, Geysir, and Gullfoss waterfall. North of Gullfoss the road gets rougher and leads into the remote and empty Highlands.

The Golden Circle route covers a loop of around 300km (185 miles) starting and ending in Reykjavík, with a number of worthy pitstops besides the 'big three' attractions. From Gullfoss to the Kerlingarfjöll area is approx 65km (40 miles) on rough roads.

When to go?

It's possible to explore the Golden Circle all year round, independently or on a guided day tour.

The Highland road (number 35, marked on some maps as F35) that heads north from Gullfoss is open only from June to September. Check up-to-date road conditions at road.is. When the road is open, you need a 4x4 rental to travel it. Highland Base hotel is open during the winter, but can only be reached via 4x4 super-jeep transfer arranged via the hotel.

If northern lights are on your wishlist, travel later in the period for more chance of seeing them - the summer daylight hours are long, so northern lights are generally visible in the right conditions from September to April. Read our aurora guide for planning advice.

Also worth noting: there are no stores or gas stations north of Gullfoss along road 35. Fill up on gas at Geysir (the closest gas station). And bring snacks!

Itinerary stops

Stop 1: Þingvellir National Park

Stop 2: Snorkeling in Silfra

Stop 3: Geysir geothermal area

Stop 4: Gullfoss waterfall

Stop 5: Overnight at Highland Base at Kerlingarfjöll, a new resort in the Highlands. There are very limited options for accommodation and dining in this region, although if you have more time, there are a handful of hiking huts lining the old Kjalvegur trail.

Stop 6: Hveradalir geothermal hiking area

Stop 7: Hveravellir geothermal area, also with simple accommodation available and a restaurant.

Stop 8: Brúarfoss waterfall

Stop 9: Overnight in Reykjavík

<iframe src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1ixAGfCgalE5tB5UQJXkok3pW97F8kz8&ehbc=2E312F" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="position: absolute;top: 0px;left: 0px;width: 100%;height: 100%;"></iframe>
,

Three days? Lucky you! Fill them by exploring the south coast's magical waterfalls, glaciers, and black beaches. Enjoy extra flexibility and the chance to stay among nature by renting a campervan.

,

South coast camping

Best in spring, summer, fall

A journey along Iceland's spectacular south coast really puts the 'ice' in Iceland. Beyond the waterfalls, black beaches, and stunning viewpoints, there are numerous ways to get close to ice in various guises: glaciers, icebergs, ice caves and more.

From Reykjavík to Jökulsárlón is approx 380km (236 super-scenic miles).

When to go?

This trip is possible year-round, either independently or joining a guided day tour.

However, the reduced amount of daylight hours in winter means we would recommend allowing a bit more time for the itinerary during the colder months. The long hours of darkness and potential for poor weather and/or icy roads mean you would be racing to see the beauty spots during daylight hours.

Skaftafell campground is open year-round, but do note that winter camping in a campervan does have some drawbacks!

If puffins are on your wishlist, travel between May and early August to view them. Read our birdwatching guide for planning advice.

Itinerary stops

Stop 1: Seljalandsfoss waterfall

Stop 2: Írárfoss waterfall

Stop 3: Skógafoss waterfall

Stop 4: Kvernufoss waterfall

Stop 5: Dyrhólaey promontory and lighthouse viewpoint

Stop 6: Overnight at Skaftafell campground (open year-round)

Stop 7: Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon. It's possible to kayak on the lagoon from May to mid-October, but there are less adventurous ways to get out on the water, too, with frequent boat trips from April to November.

Stop 8: Diamond Beach. This is the nickname given by tourists to the beautiful stretch of black sand where icebergs from Jökulsárlón rest as they journey out to sea.

Stop 9: Fish and chips with a lagoon view!

Stop 10: Múlagljúfur canyon

Stop 11: Overnight at Þakgil campground (open June to mid-September)

Stop 12: Katla Ice Cave. Note that the ice cave is only accessible via guided tour, with a number of operators offering day trips from the town of Vík.

Stop 13: Skool Beans cafe in Vík

Stop 14: Paragliding at Vík

Stop 15: Overnight in Reykjavík – there are loads of quality hotel options for a little luxury after a few nights of camping. For views and rooftop vibes, The Reykjavík Edition is a good choice.

<iframe src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1jreEPaa9eovmrtPR3GaEI4CBXYA1uWU&ehbc=2E312F" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" style="position: absolute;top: 0px;left: 0px;width: 100%;height: 100%;"></iframe>
,

We've got some great itinerary inspiration on this page thanks to Ása Steinars' Stopover videos illustrating how you can make the most of your time in the Land of Fire and Ice, whether it's 24, 48 or 72 wonder-filled hours.

From whale watching to Highland wandering, our itineraries are full of ideas. Mix and match to design your perfect trip!

,

Prefer someone else to help arrange your Stopover itinerary? We can help!

There's a wide range of tours and activities you can enjoy during your Stopover in Iceland.

From exploring the popular Golden Circle route to taking a dip in the world-famous Blue Lagoon, it’s easy to book all your trips in one place with Icelandair.

,

When is the best time to visit Iceland?

If we’re honest, we think it’s always a good time to visit Iceland. But, depending on what you’d like to see or do, you might want to come during a specific season. For example, during winter to see the northern lights or summer to see the midnight sun.

How to prepare for hunting the northern lights

Ah, the elusive northern lights! If you’re visiting Iceland in winter, they’re likely to be top of your list of things to see. We’ve collected everything you need to know about how and where to see the northern lights in Iceland, as well as what to pack and wear on your trip.

How to make the most of the midnight sun in Iceland

If you have grand plans to see as much of the island as possible, we’d recommend visiting Iceland during the summer midnight sun season. The long daylight hours allow you to fit more into your itinerary and pack your day with even more fun sightseeing and exploring.

,

Got a thing for watching wildllife? Time your visit well to get close to some of the animals that call Iceland home.

What’s so special about the Icelandic horse?

The Icelandic horse is treasured by Icelanders, and once you learn more about its cultural and historical significance, it’s easy to see why. Find out more about the unique gait of the Icelandic horse, how many horses call Iceland their home, and how you can see them for yourself.

Where should you go to see Iceland’s rich birdlife?

The island is famed for being home to the beloved puffin, but did you know that Iceland boasts a much richer birdwatching scene? Discover the best places to spot birds in Iceland.

How can you see whales in Iceland?

There are around 23 species of whales found in Iceland's waters. Some species reside here all year long, while others just pass through for the spring/summer feeding season. This is one of the best places in the world for whale watching.

,

From sweaters to hot springs, dig deeper into what makes Iceland unique.

What's all the fuss about hot springs and geothermal pools in Iceland?

Icelanders relax and unwind in warm water all over the country. Soak spots are found in fantastically varied places, from small natural hot springs to large, well-maintained swimming pools in Reykjavík and in virtually every town and village in Iceland. New to the scene are a growing number of deluxe lagoons and spa experiences.

And the knitwear...?

Iceland’s distinctive wool sweater is the very essence of winter coziness. It’s known as a lopapeysa (or a 'lopi' for short) and has become a national icon – as well as a perfect souvenir of a visit to Iceland.

,

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about taking a Stopover in Iceland. 

How can I book a Stopover in Iceland with Icelandair?

It’s easy to book your Stopover in Iceland with Icelandair. 

When booking your flight, simply select the option to ‘Stopover in Iceland’. You can then choose how many days you’d like to spend in Iceland and explore your booking options.

Does the Icelandair Stopover include hotels and accommodation?

The Icelandair Stopover only includes the flights – any accommodation should be booked separately. 

There is a range of options out there, from cozy cabins to comfortable and sophisticated hotels, and something for every traveler.

Is a Stopover in Iceland worth it?

Absolutely! While on route to your transatlantic destination, you can make the most of the journey by enjoying a Stopover in Iceland. 

Iceland, the Land of Fire and Ice, has so much to offer. From dazzling glaciers to breathtaking waterfalls, this country is one of marvelous natural sights and a flourishing cultural scene.

Does Icelandair offer free Stopovers?

A Stopover in Iceland with Icelandair carries no additional airfare, making it easier and more affordable for you to explore two destinations in just one trip.

Why does the overall trip cost vary when a Stopover in Iceland is selected?

There is no additional airfare cost to stop for a few days in Iceland. However, some travelers notice a difference in their overall flight cost when they add a Stopover in Iceland to their booking. 

This is simply because airfare prices vary according to demand, so traveling your second flight leg on a different day may impact the overall price. 

If you first select a fare without a Stopover and see a certain price, and then add a Stopover and see a different price, this reflects the price of traveling on the specific dates you choose. 

A change fee does also apply if you change an existing booking to a stopover and there will possibly be a difference in the fare price based on the above.

For travelers with date flexibility, we recommend trying different date combinations to explore your Stopover options.

Can I add a Stopover to my booking after I’ve paid for my flight?

Yes, it is possible to add a Stopover in Iceland to your flight booking by contacting our service center. Please note that fees may apply.

Can I store my luggage somewhere during my Stopover in Iceland?

Travelers taking a Stopover in Iceland often travel with multiple bags. 

For those passengers who don't wish to have their baggage with them during their stay in Iceland, there are several options available for you on where to store your baggage.

Ready to book your Stopover?We look forward to welcoming you on board